The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cambridge Guide to Consumer Privacy - Selinger Polonetsky Tene 03

Evan Seligner, Jules Polonetsky, and Omer Tene have just published a terrific edited volume of essays called The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer PrivacyThis is a truly impressive collection of writings by a wide array of authors from academia and practice. There’s a robust diversity of viewpoints on wide-ranging and cutting-edge issues.  The book has a hefty price tag, but it is a terrific resource.    

Cambridge Guide to Consumer Privacy - Selinger Polonetsky Tene 02

I have a blurb on the back of the book. This is what I wrote:

The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy is a magnificent collection of essays – each one short, engaging, and thought-provoking. The broad range of topics covers the most important and vital issues in consumer privacy, and these essays will be relevant for years to come. The authors are a superb assembly of the leading scholars and practitioners from diverse fields and perspectives. This book is a true feast of ideas.

Below is the table of contents.  I found a few of these essays on SSRN, where they are available for free, and I am linking to the ones I found.

Part I  Introduction

1 Consumer Privacy and the Future of Society 3
Jules Polonetsky, Omer Tene, and Evan Selinger

 

Part II   The Pervasiveness and Value of Tracking Technologies

2 Data Brokers: Should They Be Reviled or Revered? 25
Jennifer Barrett Glasgow

3 In Defense of Big Data Analytics 47
Mark MacCarthy

4 Education Technology and Student Privacy 70
Elana Zeide

5 Mobile Privacy Expectations: How Privacy Is Respected in Mobile Devices 85
Kirsten Martin and Katie Shilton

6 Face Recognition, Real-Time Identification, and Beyond 102
Yana Welinder and Aeryn Palmer

7 Smart Cities: Privacy, Transparency, and Community 125
Kelsey Finch and Omer Tene

 

Part III   Ethical and Legal Reservations about Tracking Technologies

8 Americans and Marketplace Privacy: Seven Annenberg National Surveys in Perspective 151
Joseph Turow

9 The Federal Trade Commission’s Inner Privacy Struggle 168
Chris Jay Hoofnagle

10 Privacy and Human Behavior in the Information Age 184
Alessandro Acquisti, Laura Brandimarte, and George Lowenstein

11 Privacy, Vulnerability, and Affordance 198
Ryan Calo

12 Ethical Considerations When Companies Study – and Fail to Study – Their Customers 207
Michelle N. Meyer

13 Algorithmic Discrimination vs. Privacy Law 232
Alvaro M. Bedoya

14 Children, Privacy, and the New Online Realities 241
Stephen Balkam

15 Stakeholders and High Stakes: Divergent Standards for Do Not Track 251
Aleecia M. McDonald

16 Applying Ethics When Using Data beyond Individuals’ Understanding 270
Martin E. Abrams and Lynn A. Goldstein

 

Part IV   International Perspectives

17 Profiling and the Essence of the Right to Data Protection 285
Bilyana Petkova and Franziska Boehm

18 Privacy, Freedom of Expression, and the Right to Be Forgotten in Europe 301
Stefan Kulk and Frederik Zuiderveen Borgesius

19 Understanding the Balancing Act behind the Legitimate Interest of the Controller Ground: A Pragmatic Approach 321
Irene Kamara and Paul De Hert

 

Part V  New Approaches to Improve the Status Quo

20 The Intersection of Privacy and Consumer Protection 355
Julie Brill

21 A Design Space for Effective Privacy Notices 365
Florian Schaub, Rebecca Balebako, Adam L. Durity, and Lorrie Faith Cranor

22 Enter the Professionals: Organizational Privacy in a Digital Age 394
J. Trevor Hughes and Cobun Keegan

23 Privacy Statements: Purposes, Requirements, and Best Practices 413
Mike Hintze

24 Privacy versus Research in Big Data 433
Jane R. Bambauer

25 A Marketplace for Privacy: Incentives for Privacy Engineering and Innovation 446
Courtney Bowman and John Grant

26 The Missing Role of Economics in FTC Privacy Policy 465
James C. Cooper and Joshua Wright

27 Big Data by Design: Establishing Privacy Governance by Analytics 489
Dale Skivington, Lisa Zolidis, and Brian P. O’Connor

28 The Future of Self-Regulation Is Co-Regulation 503
Ira S. Rubinstein

29 Privacy Notices: Limitations, Challenges, and Opportunities 524
Mary J. Culnan and Paula J. Bruening

30 It Takes Data to Protect Data 546
David A. Hoffman and Patricia A. Rimo

31 Are Benefit-Cost Analysis and Privacy Protection Efforts Incompatible? 561
Adam Thierer

32 Privacy after the Agile Turn 579
Seda Gürses and Joris van Hoboken

 

You’ll definitely want to have The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Privacy on your bookshelf!

* * * *

This post was authored by Professor Daniel J. Solove, who through TeachPrivacy develops computer-based privacy and data security training. He also posts at his blog at LinkedIn, which has more than 1 million followers.

Professor Solove is the organizer, along with Paul Schwartz, of the Privacy + Security Forum (Oct. 3-5, 2018 in Washington, DC), an annual event designed for seasoned professionals. 

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