All posts in Cartoons HIPAA

HIPAA Cartoon: Notice of Privacy Practices

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cartoon HIPAA Notice - TeachPrivacy HIPAA Training 02 medium

This HIPAA cartoon involves the notice of privacy practices (NPP) under HIPAA.  HIPAA has a set of detailed requirements for the NPP.  See 45 CFR 164.520 for the text of HIPAA’s requirement for NPPs.

The biggest challenge regarding privacy notices is that hardly anyone actually reads the notice, and notices are often a chore to read.

There is a Hobson’s choice when it comes to such notices, whether under HIPAA or otherwise.  As I wrote in Privacy Self-Management and the Consent Dilemma, 126 Harvard Law Review 1880 (2013): “[M]aking [notices] simple and easy to understand conflicts with fully informing people about the consequences of giving up data, which are quite complex if explained in sufficient detail to be meaningful.  People need a deeper understanding and background to make informed choices.”  Sadly, there’s no easy way to win on this one.

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HIPAA Cartoon: Breach of Confidentiality

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cartoon HIPAA Confidentiality - TeachPrivacy HIPAA Training 02

This HIPAA cartoon involves confidentiality. There are countless cases of misdirected PHI that is emailed or faxed to the wrong people.

I recently created a new short course on HIPAA Confidentiality.  You can learn more about it here.

HIPAA Training
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Cartoon: HIPAA Protected Health Information

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cartoon HIPAA PHI - TeachPrivacy HIPAA Training 02

Here’s a new HIPAA cartoon. This cartoon is about protected health information (PHI).  In the HIPAA regulations, the definition of PHI is quite complicated, as it is splintered into at least three separate parts that appear in HIPAA’s definitions section.  Pursuant to HIPAA, 45 CFR 160.103:

Health information means any information, including genetic information, whether oral or recorded in any form or medium, that:
(1) Is created or received by a health care provider, health plan, public health authority, employer, life insurer, school or university, or health care clearinghouse; and
(2) Relates to the past, present, or future physical or mental health or condition of an individual; the provision of health care to an individual; or the past, present, or future payment for the provision of health care to an individual.

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Cartoon About Connected Devices

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cartoon Connected Devices - Internet of Things

This cartoon depicts the potential future of the Internet of Things.  As more and more devices are connected to the Internet, including ones implanted in people’s bodies, increasing thought must be given to the privacy and security implications.  The speed of technological development is moving at a far greater pace than the speed of policy thinking regarding privacy and security.

How will the security of new devices be regulated?  The market doesn’t seem to be adequately addressing the security of the Internet of Things.  Bad security in devices has externalities beyond the users, as devices can be used as part of botnets to attack other targets.

How will privacy be designed into devices?  How will notice and choice work?  When privacy is “baked in” to a device, do the engineers have a comprehensive understanding of privacy?  How will consumers be able to understand and respond to these design choices?

Should there be special considerations for medical devices or any device that is implantable in a person?

We still await satisfactory answers to these questions . . . but the expansion of the Internet of Things isn’t waiting.

Here’s an earlier cartoon I created regarding the Internet of Things:

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Phishing Cartoon: Signs of a Phishing Scam

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Misspelled words and bad grammar are tell-tale signs of phishing.   Why don’t phishers learn spelling and grammar?  Can’t they afford a copy of Strunk and White?

Phishers don’t need to spell better because their poorly-written schemes still fool enough people.  It’s just math for the phishers — a numbers game.   If you handle IT security at your organization, don’t assume that people won’t fall for obvious phishing scams — they do.   That’s why it is essential to train people — again and again.

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