All posts in Health Privacy

HIPAA Whiteboard and HIPAA Interactive Whiteboard

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

HIPAA Whiteboard

Recently, I created two new HIPAA training resources.

HIPAA Whiteboard

I created a 1-page visual summary of HIPAA, which I call the HIPAA WhiteboardThe idea was to summarize HIPAA in a concise and visually-engaging way.  You can download a PDF handout version here.  We’ve been licensing it to many organizations for training and awareness purposes.

HIPAA Whiteboard - TeachPrivacy HIPAA Training

HIPAA Interactive Whiteboard

I subsequently created a new training module — an interactive version of the HIPAA Whiteboard — the HIPAA Interactive Whiteboard When people click on each topic, the program provides brief narrated background information, presented in a very understandable and memorable way.  Trainees can learn at their own pace.  This program is designed to be very short — it is about 5 minutes long.

It can readily be used on internal websites to raise awareness and teach basic information about HIPAA.  It can also be used in learning management systems.

HIPAA Whiteboard Interactive - TeachPrivacy HIPAA Training

HIPAA Whiteboard Interactive - TeachPrivacy HIPAA Training

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HIPAA Enforcement 2017: Another Big Year for HIPAA Enforcement

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

HIPAA Enforcement

At the end of 2017, the OCR logged just under $20 million in fines for HIPAA violations from 10 enforcement actions with monetary penalties.  In 2016, the total in penalties was roughly the same amount but from 15 organizations.

Here is an overview of the resolution agreements and enforcement actions with civil monetary penalties from 2017:

HIPAA Enforcement Chart

Lessons from 2017

Devices, devices, devices . . .

Quite a number of cases involved failure to implement safeguards for PHI on mobile devices.  The best fix is to superglue devices to staff.  Short of doing that, organizations should recognize that mobile devices frequently get lost or stolen, so there should be heightened security controls when PHI is accessible on these devices.

Act quickly.

Several cases involved failing to provide timely notice or to act promptly after problems were discovered.  In politics, it’s often not the scandal, but the coverup that fells politicians.  In the world of HIPAA, it’s often not the incident, but the response that leads to organizations being penalized.

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Privacy and Security in Health Tech: Improving Transparency About Practices

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Many app developers overlook privacy and security by failing to do one of the most basic first steps of data protection – informing consumers of their practices. For example, in a study published in 2016 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, 80% of diabetes apps surveyed didn’t have a notice informing consumers about privacy practices.  Another recent study of thousands of apps involving all topics revealed that nearly 50% lacked a privacy notice. A study by the Future of Privacy Forum in 2016 revealed that “only 70% of top health and fitness apps had a privacy policy.”

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HIPAA Cartoon on Snooping

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

This cartoon is about snooping, one of the most common HIPAA violations.  HIPAA prohibits accessing information that people don’t need to do their jobs.   It can be easy to look at electronic medical records, and people who snoop in this way might not perceive it as wrong.  But the cartoon invites people to imagine how creepy the snooping would appear if it were occurring right in front of patients.  Computers remove the interpersonal dynamic, making it harder for people to fully appreciate the wrongfulness of their conduct.

Though the high-profile, celebrity snooping incidents garner all the media attention, smaller cases affecting everyday individuals make up the bulk of the cases and legal activity.  A large number of inappropriate access claims involve people checking on protected health information (PHI) about family and friends.  Snooping is not intended maliciously.  Often a concerned staff member will access the patient records of a family member or acquaintance out of worry or concern.  In one case, a nurse in New York was fired for disclosing a patient’s medical history to warn a family member who was romantically involved with the patient of the patient’s STD.

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HIPAA’s Failure to Provide Enough Patient Control Over Medical Records

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

HIPAA Privacy Rule

 

A Not-So-Far-Fetched Seinfeld Episode

In a Seinfeld episode called “The Package” from 1996 (click here to see the scene), airing just months after HIPAA was passed,  Elaine goes to see a doctor for a rash.

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Is HIPAA Enforcement Too Lax?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

title

By Daniel J. Solove

ProPublica has been running a series of lengthy articles about HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) enforcement that are worth reading.

A Sustained and Vigorous Critique of OCR HIPAA Enforcement

A ProPublica article from early in 2015 noted that HIPAA fines were quite rare. The article noted that from 2009 through 2014, more than 1,140 large data breaches were reported to OCR, affecting 41 million people. Another 120,000 HIPAA violations were reported affecting fewer than 500 people. “Yet, over that time span,” the article notes, “the Office for Civil Rights has fined health care organizations just 22 times. . . . By comparison, the California Department of Public Health . . . imposed 22 penalties last year alone.”

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Blogging Highlights 2015: Health Privacy+Security Issues

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

HIPAA Training

I’ve been going through my blog posts from 2015 to find the ones I most want to highlight.  Here are some selected posts about health privacy and security:

Why HIPAA Matters: Medical ID Theft and the
Human Cost of Health Privacy and Security Incidents

care

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Why HIPAA Matters: Medical ID Theft and the Human Cost of Health Privacy and Security Incidents

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Why HIPAA matters

By Daniel J. Solove

Whenever I go to a doctor and am asked what I do for a living, I say that I focus on information privacy law.

“HIPAA?” the doctors will ask.

“Yes, HIPAA,” I confess.

And then the doctor’s face turns grim.  At first, it looks like the face of a doctor about to tell you that you’ve got a fatal disease.  Then, the doctor’s face crinkles up slightly with disgust. This face is so distinctive and so common that I think it should be called “HIPAA face.”  It’s about as bad as “stink eye.”

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Patient Access to Medical Records Under HIPAA: Significant Reform Needed

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Doctor taking notes in his office, isolated

by Daniel J. Solove

Recently, I wrote about the challenges in accessing health information about family members.  In this post, I will explore patients’ access to their own medical records.

HIPAA doesn’t handle patient access to medical records very well. There are many misunderstandings about patient access under HIPAA that make it quite difficult for patients to obtain their medical information quickly and conveniently.

Getting records is currently like a scavenger hunt. Patients have to call and call again, wait seemingly forever to get records, and receive them via ancient means like mail and fax. I often scratch my head at why fax is still used today — it’s one step more advanced than carrier pigeon.

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