Is George Washington Constitutional?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

George Washington 02

Over at Balkinization, Jack Balkin has a humorous post about interpreting Article II, section 1, clause 4 of the Constitution, which requires that only “natural born citizens” be eligible to be President. The clause provides:

No person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the United States.

Balkin writes:

In other words, the original public meaning of the clause says that to be President you either have to have been a natural born Citizen at the time of the adoption of the Constitution, or otherwise a citizen of the United States at the time of adoption, i.e., 1789. That means that persons born after 1789 aren’t eligible to be President of the United States. And that includes not only John McCain, but Hillary Clinton and Barrack Obama. (In fact, it includes George W. Bush, but everybody knows he wasn’t legally elected anyway.) . . . .

The rest of the sentence reads: “neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the United States.” Now Article VII holds that the Constitution comes into being when nine states ratify, which occurred on June 21, 1789, when New Hampshire became the ninth state. But this means that nobody could be a resident within the United States until June 21, 1789, and so nobody could be President until June 21, 1805. And that means that Thomas Jefferson, not George Washington, was the first legal President of the United States.

I sure hope that we can find some way to make George Washington constitutional. It would be quite a bummer if he weren’t constitutional, especially since I teach at George Washington University Law School.

Originally Posted at Concurring Opinions

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This post was authored by Professor Daniel J. Solove, who through TeachPrivacy develops computer-based privacy training, data security training, HIPAA training, and many other forms of awareness training on privacy and security topics. Professor Solove also posts at his blog at LinkedIn. His blog has more than 1 million followers.

Professor Solove is the organizer, along with Paul Schwartz, of the Privacy + Security Forum and International Privacy + Security Forum, annual events designed for seasoned professionals.

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