All posts tagged Danielle Citron

Notable Privacy and Security Books 2014

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Notable Privacy Security Books 2014 - TeachPrivacy 01

There were quite a number of books published about privacy and security issues last year, and I would like to highlight a few notable ones. A few books came out in late 2014 and have an early 2015 publication date. I’m including them here. The books are in no particular order.

Continue Reading

Jennifer Lawrence’s Nude Photos and Civil Rights Law: An Interview with Danielle Citron

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Online Harm

“It is a sexual violation. It’s disgusting.
The law needs to be changed, and we need to change.”
Jennifer Lawrence on her nude photos being
non-consensually disclosed online

Fairly recently, Jennifer Lawrence’s iCloud account was hacked and her private nude photos were stolen and posted online. She was mortified.

Her case is just one of many, according to Professor Danielle Citron (University of Maryland School of Law), who very recently published a book about online harassment, Hate Crimes in Cyberspace (Harvard University Press 2014).

Citron - Hate Crimes in Cyberspace

It is a compelling and provocative book. It is a bold book. And as the recent news stories indicate, it is a book that couldn’t be more timely and more needed. One might think that online harassment is rare. Who would write such mean and vile things? What kind of person would harass Zelda Williams, the daughter of Robin Williams, who was viciously attacked online immediately after her father’s death? Even Caligula would show more humanity.

Continue Reading

CCR Symposium: Anonymity and Traceability

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Anonymous

In an interesting and thoughtful critique of Danielle Citron’s Cyber Civil Rights, Michael Froomkin argues that Danielle’s proposal to require ISPs to maintain records of IP addresses will spell “the complete elimination of anonymity on the US portion of the Internet in order to root out hateful speech.” Anonymous speech should be strongly protected, as it is key to allowing people to express themselves candidly and openly, without fear of reprisal. It is especially important to promote dissenting views that are outside the mainstream of conventional thought. But the key issue with anonymity online is: How much do we want to protect it? Anonymous speech can lead to harmful defamation, invasion of privacy, intentional infliction of emotional distress, as well as criminal conduct, such as the spread of child porn. Is there a way to protect anonymity yet not let it get too out of hand?

Continue Reading