PRIVACY + SECURITY BLOG

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What Is Sensitive Data? Different Definitions in Privacy Law

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by Daniel J. Solove

I was corresponding with K. Royal the other day, as she was graciously providing some feedback on a training program I created, and we got to talking about sensitive data. In their privacy laws, many countries designate a special category of data called “sensitive data” that receives especially stringent protections.

The most common list of categories for sensitive data is the list in the EU Data Protection Directive, which includes data about “racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade-union memberships, health, and sex life.”

The US has no special category of “sensitive data” but US privacy law does protect certain forms of data more stringently (health, financial).

I find it interesting what various countries define as sensitive data, and K Royal has created an awesome chart that she shared with me:

Chart of Sensitive Data in Various Countries

To a privacy wonk like me, a chart like this makes me giddy with excitement, and so I thought I’d share it with you (with her permission, of course).

Here’s a tally of the various types of most-commonly recognized categories of sensitive data. This is based on a chart of the sensitive data category of many countries that K Royal created.

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SPECIFIC COUNTRIES’ DEFINITIONS OF SENSITIVE DATA

You can access the full Excel spreadsheet of the data here.

Note: The entry for “standard” means the standard list from the EU Data Protection Directive. The categories encompassed by “standard” include the one beginning “national, Racial/Ethnic” through “sexual preferences and practices.”  More background about K’s project can be found at her blog.

If you want to see the spreadsheet data laid out in a blog post, you can see my longer post about the issue at my LinkedIn Blog.

Is the Right to Be Forgotten Good or Bad? This Is the Wrong Question

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by Daniel J. Solove

Is the right to be forgotten good or bad?

This is the question many are asking these days in light of the recent EU Court of Justice (ECJ) decision that requires search engines such as Google to remove personal data from search results when people request it. (For more background, I wrote about the ECJ decision last week.)

After the decision was released, critics attacked the right to be forgotten as impractical, undesirable, and antithetical to free speech.

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What Google Must Forget: The EU Ruling on the Right to Be Forgotten

 

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by Daniel J. Solove

In a momentous decision, the EU Court of Justice has ruled in favor of a Spanish man who sought to have links to his personal data removed from Google search results. Under what has become known as the “right to be forgotten,” EU citizens have a right to the deletion of certain personal data under the EU Data Protection Directive.

The EU Court of Justice has concluded that “the operator of a search engine is obliged to remove from the list of results displayed following a search made on the basis of a person’s name links to web pages, published by third parties and containing information relating to that person, also in a case where that name or information is not erased beforehand or simultaneously from those web pages, and even, as the case may be, when its publication in itself on those pages is lawful.”

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