All posts tagged Right to Be Forgotten

Cartoon: GDPR Right to Be Forgotten

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Cartoon GDPR Right to Be Forgotten - TeachPrivacy GDPR Training

The GDPR Article 17 provides for a right to erasure — commonly known as the “right to be forgotten.”  Data subjects may request that an organization erase their personal data “without undue delay” under a number of circumstances.  These circumstances include when the data is no longer relevant to the purposes of collection, when consent is withdrawn and there is no other legal ground for processing, or when the data has been unlawfully processed, among other things.

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Is the Right to Be Forgotten Good or Bad? This Is the Wrong Question

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

right to be forgotten good or bad blog 1

by Daniel J. Solove

Is the right to be forgotten good or bad?

This is the question many are asking these days in light of the recent EU Court of Justice (ECJ) decision that requires search engines such as Google to remove personal data from search results when people request it. (For more background, I wrote about the ECJ decision last week.)

After the decision was released, critics attacked the right to be forgotten as impractical, undesirable, and antithetical to free speech.

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What Google Must Forget: The EU Ruling on the Right to Be Forgotten

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

 

google right to be forgotten blog 1

by Daniel J. Solove

In a momentous decision, the EU Court of Justice has ruled in favor of a Spanish man who sought to have links to his personal data removed from Google search results. Under what has become known as the “right to be forgotten,” EU citizens have a right to the deletion of certain personal data under the EU Data Protection Directive.

The EU Court of Justice has concluded that “the operator of a search engine is obliged to remove from the list of results displayed following a search made on the basis of a person’s name links to web pages, published by third parties and containing information relating to that person, also in a case where that name or information is not erased beforehand or simultaneously from those web pages, and even, as the case may be, when its publication in itself on those pages is lawful.”

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