All posts tagged Confidentiality

Silencing #MeToo: How NDAs and Litigation Stifle Victims, Innovators, and Critics — An Interview with Orly Lobel

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

 

Countless women have been coming forward to say #MeToo and share their traumatic stories of sexual harassment and assault. But there are many stories we’re not hearing. These stories are being silenced by extremely broad nondisclosure agreements (NDAs), some made at the outset of employment and others when settling litigation over sexual harassment. They stop victims from talking. They also silence other employees who witness sexual harassment of co-workers. NDAs were a powerful device used by Harvey Weinstein to hush up what he was doing.

In her new book, You Don’t Own Me: How Mattel v. MGA Entertainment Exposed Barbie’s Dark Side, Professor Orly Lobel tells a fascinating story about the Barbie versus Bratz litigation, which went on for about a decade. Her book is a page turner — told as a story that could readily be a movie. The book succeeds brilliantly as a gripping tale. But it goes beyond great storytelling to explore many important issues related to business, employment, and intellectual property: the enormous power of corporate employers, the weaponized use of intellectual property to stifle innovation, the dismal failure of business ethics, the troubling use of nondisclosure agreements (NDAs) to maintain dominance and power, and the punishing litigation process. Continue Reading

Attorney Confidentiality, Cybersecurity, and the Cloud

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Law firm data security

There is a significant degree of confusion and lack of awareness about attorney confidentiality and cybersecurity obligations.  This issue is especially acute when it comes to using the cloud to store privileged documents.  A common myth is that storing privileged documents in the cloud is a breach of attorney-client confidentiality.  In other instances, many attorneys and firms are not paying sufficient attention to their obligation to protect the confidentiality and security of the client data they maintain.

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Without Scalia, Will There Be a 4th Amendment Revolution?

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

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The passing of Justice Antonin Scalia has brought a wave of speculation about current and future U.S. Supreme Court cases.  One area where there might be a significant impact will be the 4th Amendment, which provides the primary constitutional protection against government surveillance and information gathering.  A new justice could usher in a dramatic expansion in 4th Amendment protections against government surveillance.

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The Kafkaesque Sacrifice of Encryption Security in the Name of Security

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

The Kafkaesque Sacrifice of Encryption Security in the Name of Security

By Daniel J. Solove

Proponents for allowing government officials to have backdoors to encrypted communications need to read Franz Kafka.  Nearly a century ago, Kafka deftly captured the irony at the heart of their argument in his short story, “The Burrow.”

After the Paris attacks, national security proponents in the US and abroad have been making even more vigorous attempts to mandate a backdoor to encryption.

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OPM Data Breach Fallout, Fingerprints, and Other Privacy + Security Updates

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

OPM Fallout

By Daniel J. Solove

Co-authored by Professor Paul Schwartz

This post is part of a post series where we round up some of the interesting news and resources we’re finding. For a PDF version of this post, and for archived issues of previous posts, click here. We cover health issues in a separate post.

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News

Mayer Brown survey of executives: 25% of organizations lack both a CPO and CIO (March 2015)

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Privacy Law: From a National Dish to a Global Stew

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

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By Daniel J. Solove
This post is co-authored by Professor Neil Richards

The recent case of Google v. Vidal-Hall in the UK has generated quite a buzz, with Omer Tene calling it the “European privacy judicial decision of a decade.”

The case illustrates several fascinating aspects of the developing global law of privacy, with big implications for online marketing, Big Data, and the Internet of Things.

At first blush, it is easy to see the case as one more divergence between how privacy is protected in the EU and US, with a European Court once again showing how much eager it is to protect privacy than an American one. But the biggest takeaway from the case is not one of divergence; it is one of convergence!

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Does Scholarship Really Have an Impact? The Article that Revolutionized Privacy Law

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

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By Daniel J. Solove

Does scholarship really have an impact? For a long time, naysayers have attacked scholarship, especially scholarship about law. U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Roberts once remarked: “Pick up a copy of any law review that you see, and the first article is likely to be, you know, the influence of Immanuel Kant on evidentiary approaches in 18th Century Bulgaria, or something.” He noted that when the academy addresses legal issues at “a particularly abstract, philosophical level . . . they shouldn’t expect that it would be of any particular help or even interest to the members of the practice of the bar or judges.” Judge Harry Edwards also has attacked legal scholarship as largely irrelevant.

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Ebola and Privacy: Snooping, Confidentiality, and HIPAA

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Ebola Virus Confidential

by Daniel J. Solove

The recent cases of Ebola in the United States demonstrate challenges to health privacy in today’s information age — both in preventing employees from snooping into patient information as well as preventing the disclosure of patient identities.

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