All posts in FTC

The 5 Things Every Privacy Lawyer Needs to Know about the FTC: An Interview with Chris Hoofnagle

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Privacy and Security Training

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has become the leading federal agency to regulate privacy and data security. The scope of its power is vast – it covers the majority of commercial activity – and it has been enforcing these issues for decades. An FTC civil investigative demand (CID) will send shivers down the spine of even the largest of companies, as the FTC requires a 20-year period of assessments to settle the score. Continue Reading

The Scope and Potential of FTC Data Protection

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

FTC Privacy and Security

I am pleased to announce the publication of my article, The Scope and Potential of FTC Data Protection., 83 George Washington Law Review 2230 (2015).  I wrote the article with Professor Woodrow Hartzog.

FTC StatueThe article addresses  the scope of FTC authority in the areas of privacy and data security (which together we refer to as “data protection”).  We argue that the FTC not only has the authority to regulate data protection to the extent it has been doing, but that its granted jurisdiction can expand its reach much more. Normatively, we argue that the FTC’s current scope of data protection authority is essential to the United States data protection regime and should be fully embraced to respond to the privacy harms unaddressed by existing remedies available in tort or contract, or by various statutes. In contrast to the legal theories underlying these other claims of action, the FTC can regulate with a much different and more flexible understanding of harm than one focused on monetary or physical injury.

We contend that the FTC can and should push the development of norms a little more (though not in an extreme or aggressive way). We discuss why the FTC should act with greater transparency and more nuanced sanctioning and auditing.

The article was part of a great symposium organized by the George Washington University Law Review: The FTC at 100.

GW Law Review FTC Symposium

Here is a table of contents of the issue, along with links to where you can access each essay and article.

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Start with Security: The FTC’s Data Security Guidance

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

FTC Start with Security 03

Recently, the FTC issued a short guide to what organizations can do to protect data security.  It is called Start with Security  (HTML) — a PDF version is here.  This document provides a very clear and straightforward discussion of 10 good information security measures.  It uses examples from FTC cases.

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5 Things the FTC Should Do to Improve Data Security in the Wake of Wyndham

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

Federal Trade Commission - FTC - Data Security

Over at Fierce IT Security, Professor Woodrow Hartzog and I have a new essay, 5 Things the FTC Should Do to Improve Data Security in the Wake of Wyndham The piece discusses some enforcement strategies we believe the FTC should use to maximize its effectiveness in improving data security.  Our suggestions include:

  1. Do more proactive enforcement
  2. Take on more data security cases
  3. Push companies toward improved authentication – moving beyond mere passwords
  4. Restrict the use of Social Security numbers for authentication purposes
  5. Develop a theory of data stewardship for third parties

Please check out our essay for our explanation of the above agenda and a lot more detail.

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The FTC Has the Authority to Enforce Data Security: FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corp.

Daniel Solove
Founder of TeachPrivacy

FTC 01by Daniel J. Solove

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit just affirmed the district court decision in FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corp., No. 14-3514 (3rd. Cir. Aug. 24, 2015).  The case involves a challenge by Wyndham to an Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enforcement action emerging out of data breaches at the Wyndham.

Background

Since the mid-1990s, the FTC has been enforcing Section 5 of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. § 45, in instances involving privacy and data security.  Section 5 prohibits “unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce.”  Deception and unfairness are two independent bases for FTC enforcement.  During the past 15-20 years, the FTC has brought about 180 enforcement actions, the vast majority of which have settled.  Wyndham was one of the exceptions; instead of settling, it challenged the FTC’s authority to enforce to protect data security as an unfair trade practice.

Among the arguments made by Wyndham, three are most worth focusing on:

FTC PNG 02a(1) Because Congress enacted data security laws to regulate specific industries, Congress didn’t intend for the FTC to be able to regulate data security under the FTC Act.

(2) The FTC is not providing fair notice about the security practices it deems as “unfair” because it is enforcing on a case-by-case basis rather than promulgating a set of specific practices it deems as unfair.

(3) The FTC failed to establish “substantial injury to consumers” as required to enforce for unfairness.

The district court rejected all three of these arguments, and so did the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals.  Here is a very brief overview of the 3rd Circuit’s reasoning.

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